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The 4 Best Jewish Wedding Gifts to Give

There’s nothing quite like a Jewish wedding. The melodious blessings recited under the wedding canopy, or chuppah. The bride encircling the groom. The groom breaking a glass, followed by hearty shouts of, “Mazal tov!” Lively circles of friends and family, dancing with clasped hands, celebrating the new couple as they begin their life together as husband and wife.

Wondering what gift to give the new couple as they celebrate this momentous event in their lives? Jewish wedding gifts range from traditional to modern, from personal to practical. We’ve got some great wedding gift ideas that are sure to delight both bride and groom.

Judaica

A Jewish wedding ceremony is rife with tradition and ritual. Help the new couple keep Judaism at the forefront of their marriage with a meaningful Judaica gift they will enjoy using on a regular basis. Judaica is a very popular wedding gift.

Several Judaica gifts center around Shabbat, and with good reason. Shabbat is a weekly opportunity for the couple to reconnect and regroup. Shabbat-related gifts include candlesticks, a kiddush cup for wine, and a challah cutting board, challah knife, or a beautiful challah cover. These objects will be appreciated by the couple as they observe Shabbat or host Shabbat dinners for friends and family for many years to come. 

A havdalah set comprised of a candle, besamim (fragrant spice) holder, wine cup, and tray, makes for a beautiful gift that the couple can use to usher away Shabbat at its conclusion. 

Judaica related to the Jewish holidays is also a popular gift choice. Each holiday comes with its own special rituals and observances, and taking out that special gift to use at a holiday is a great way to remember the giver. Holiday Judaica includes a honey dish for Rosh Hashana, an etrog box for Sukkot, a menorah for Hanukkah, a seder plate for Passover, and more. There are tons of different styles and price points for Judaica gifts.

Art

A couple getting married are looking to add beauty, meaning, and direction to their lives. Art makes a great wedding present, especially when there is a unique, personal touch to the gift. A painting or a sculpture can be suitable for a wedding gift, as can a piece of beautiful, modern wall art with a timeless Torah message. A Blessing for the Home, or a powerful verse from Proverbs or the Song of Solomon come immediately to mind for a Jewish wedding gift. There may be another verse that holds particular meaning for the couple. Biblical wall art can be personalized with the couple’s names and wedding date, making this gift truly one of a kind.

Household Items

Building a life together involves establishing a household, and kitchen our household items are often given as wedding gifts as well. Does the couple have a gift registry? Find out whether there are any specific items they’ve designated that they want. Cookware, small appliances, and even some great kosher cookbooks can make for Jewish wedding gifts that are both fun and practical. When the couple uses that great gift you got them, they will have a smile on their faces remembering that you were the giver.

Money

Not sure what to get the couple? Maybe they’ve already got most of what they need to establish their home together. Or maybe you’re unsure of what they’d like. Money is always appreciated, albeit less personal. Money given as a Jewish wedding gift is usually given in denominations of 18, which has the numerical value of chai, which means life. What’s the right amount to give? The answer varies tremendously, but there are online calculators that can help you zero in on an appropriate amount. 

Whether the Jewish wedding you’re attending is one of friends, relatives, or coworkers, it is always a joyous event filled with tradition, togetherness, and celebration. A great gift shows the couple how excited you are that they’re tying the knot, and is a nice opportunity to let your personality shine through. Here’s wishing you and the happy couple many more opportunities to say “mazel tov” in the future!